Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Andy Varbel's Home Page

English 1A Mission College
Home
English 1A Mission College
English 908 Mission College
English 1C Mission College
English 905 Mission College
English 1B Mission College
EWRT 1A De Anza
EWRT 1B De Anza
EWRT 2 De Anza
LART 211 De Anza College
EWRT 200 De Anza
EWRT 211 De Anza
EWRT 1B Honors De Anza

                                                                                             
Syllabus

 
ENGLISH 1A-90321  Tues 700-10:10PM   MT-14   Andy Varbel
Office Hours: Adjunct Faculty Center Thurs 330-430 PM   Spring 2011
Phone #: (408) 864-8999 Ext. 3509    E-mail:
acv1356@aol.com
My Web Page:
http://varbelenglish.tripod.com/
My mailbox is found in the Adjunct Faculty Center
                                                                                                                                              

Texts:  Required              

1.  Stubbs, Barnet, Cain, The Little, Brown Reader, 11th edition only
2.  Morrison, Sula

Recommended:  Keys for Writers  

Course Description: 

 

Integrated approach to reading, writing, and critical thinking intended to develop ability to read and write complex, college-level prose.  Current MLA documentation guidelines are also emphasized.  This course is transferable to state schools and UC’s. This course fulfills the English requirement for an associate degree for various majors.  Prerequisite: English 908 or English 59 or qualifying score on the placement test.  Advisory:  Reading 53

Course Organization:

The course is organized around a process approach.  Readings from the text are emphasized, with considerable importance attached to peer group participation.

Course Requirements:

1.  Participation in class.
2.  10 surprise quizzes on the reading due for that day.
3.  10 Journal Entries.
4.  Occasional homework questions.
5.  Three take home formal essays.
6.  A research paper.
7.  Final Exam, which will be an in-class essay.
8.  A Group Presentation
                                          

Student Learning Outcomes:

 

Upon completion of Engl 1A, students will be able to:

 

  • Write a college-level essay, including an argument and research essay, of at least 1,000 words that is focused, tailored to a particular audience and purpose, developed with relevant, well-organized support, documented according to MLA guidelines, and expressed in correct and varied sentences.
  • Analyze culturally diverse, college-level writing, including a full-length work.

 Objectives:

 Students should learn to:

 

  • Create a college-level essay, including an argument and research essay, with an identifiable focus, tailored to a particular audience and purpose, with well-developed, relevant, and clearly organized supporting detail.
  • Effectively perform the steps of the writing process, including narrowing a topic, finding a main idea, developing and organizing a variety of support, drafting, editing, revising, and proofreading.
  • Create clear, grammatical and varied sentences using appropriate diction and correct spelling and punctuation [with no more than five major errors per page].
  • Read, understand, and analyze culturally diverse, college-level writing, including essays, articles, stories, and a full-length fiction book.
  • Locate, evaluate, and effectively synthesize supporting material drawn from readings or other sources in an essay.
  • Precisely document outside sources in his or her essays using current MLA form. 
  • Write 8,000-10,000 words of evaluated work 

Grading:  This is a letter grade only course.   Each of your assignments will receive points.  90%=A, 80%=B, 70%=C, 60%=D  (Possible 900 points)

        Narrative Essay=75 points

        In-Class Analytical Essay=100 pts

        Persuasive Essay=125 points

        Research Paper=200 pts

        Final Exam, which is an in-class Literary Analysis=200 pts

        Group Presentation=50 pts

        Ten Quizzes=5 pts each=50 pts

        Ten Journal Entries=5 pts each=50 pts

        Participation=50 pts

 

NOTE:  To pass this class, you must earn 70% or greater.  To pass this class, you must also pass at least one of the two in-class essays.

 

Journal Entries:  For most weeks, a journal entry is due based upon the reading.  The entry should be at least 1 full page in length, typed, double spaced, and 12-point font.  The entry should not summarize the reading, but instead provide your reaction to it.  You can relate a similar personal experience or, if you like, give your opinion in response to the author’s or simply explain whether you enjoyed the reading and why or why not.   Be sure to explain why you feel the way you do.  The purpose of the journal entries is to give you additional practice writing in a less formal setting than the essays due for the class.  The journals are a place to try out ideas and take chances without worry about undue consequence. 

Formal Essays:  These essays must be at least 4 pages in length, typed, double spaced, 12-point font, have a title, and be free of excessive spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors or lack of organization.  Each essay must adhere to the current MLA documentation format.  You may turn in an essay one week late though this will result in your paper being lowered one full formal grade.  I will not accept any papers later than one week after the due date. 

The English Department recently adopted a 5 error per page policy.  If a Formal Essay contains 5 or more errors per page, the essay won’t receive credit.  Students can rewrite each formal essay ONCE to receive a letter grade and points.   In order to be able to rewrite the essay, students MUST be present on peer response day with two COMPLETE copies of the rough draft of the paper and turn those in along with the final draft and the feedback received for the rough draft.   If a student’s Research Paper contains 5 or more errors per page, it won’t receive a passing grade.

Research Paper:

The Research Paper must be typed, double-spaced, use 12-point font, have a title, contain in-text citations, be 8-10 pages in length, accompanied by a Works Cited Sheet and adhere to the most current MLA documentation format.  Two rough drafts and student response sheets must accompany the final paper and all work must be stapled together.  The Works Cited Sheet must have 5 or more secondary sources.  The Research Paper is a mandatory project and must be satisfactorily completed and submitted on time to pass the class.

Presentation:  You will participate in one group presentation in which your group’s goal will be to create a dramatic and engaging discussion of the issues in a particular article that you will be assigned from The Little, Brown Reader.  Your presentation should take the form of a talk show with a host moderating a discussion about the central issue that the article focuses on.  You will receive an individual grade for this presentation, which will not necessarily be the same as the grade of your other group members.  Points will be based upon thoughtfulness, clarity, and creativity.

Participation:

Criteria:  0 absences with excellent participation, 45-50 points; 1 absence with good participation, 40-44 points; 2 absences with good participation, 35-39 points.  Participation includes discussion, group work, arriving on time, turning in work on time.  Chronic tardiness, lack of preparation, late work will lower your participation grade to 29 points or below.

As we discuss many controversial topics in class, we are all responsible for courtesy to each other, good will, and listening to others’ points of view even if we don’t share them.  Speakers should be recognized and should keep comments under one minute at a time to allow for maximum discussion. 

Attendance:

Be here.  Attendance every day is mandatory.  Be here on time and fully prepared.  You are responsible for what happens in class whether you are here or not; get a phone or email partner so you can contact another class member if you are absent.

Missing more than ten minutes of any class meeting counts as half an absence.  Should you happen to come in late, NEVER walk in between the other students and myself.  Instead, be respectful to your classmates and me and inconspicuously make your entrance.  But do everything you can to be here on time.  If you are late, you may lose the opportunity to take a particular quiz.   Quizzes cannot be made up.

Missing an entire class meeting constitutes an absence.   More than 2 absences may result in your being dropped from the course.

Rude and disruptive behavior is not acceptable and will not be tolerated.  Students should not talk while I am addressing the class.  Any student who exhibits disruptive/ rude behavior will be asked to leave the class and marked absent.

Plagiarism:

Don’t do it.  Plagiarism is hereby defined as handing in any work as your own when in fact, you did not create it yourself.  This includes, but is not limited to, essays downloaded from the web; essays copied from a book, newspaper or magazine; essays written by a friend/ tutor/ spouse/ sibling/ relative; essays you “wrote” but which were more or less dictated to you by someone else; essays you acquired from a “research service.”   In addition, if an essay includes facts that are not part of general knowledge, or includes other people’s ideas, you must acknowledge the sources of that information.  If you plagiarize once, you will receive a 0 on the assignment, I will speak to you confidentially, and administrative follow up may result.  If the student continues to cheat they will fail the course.  Remember: all of your work must be your own.

Cell Phones and Beepers:

Keep them turned OFF during class.  Allowing your cell phone or beeper to ring during class is disruptive and extremely rude to your classmates and me.

Asking Questions:

Please do.  Always ask me if you do not understand an assignment or the class work, or if you are unsure of what we are doing and why.  Also, please do not hesitate to come talk with me during office hours if you have any questions or concerns.  

Disability Statement: 

Federal legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities.  If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact DISC in S2-201 or call (408) 855-5085 or (408) 727-9243 TTY.

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

According to the Vice President of Instruction, it is the student’s responsibility to know the evacuation procedures, evacuation route, and assembly area for their classrooms.  In case of an emergency, you are to follow the directions of your instructor. When directed to evacuate the classroom, be sure to take all of your belongings when you leave and remain with your class in the assembly area until you receive further directions.

SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND SEX DISCRIMINATION POLICY

 

Members of an academic community—students, faculty and staff—must be able to work in an atmosphere of mutual respect and trust. Students, teachers and staff must feel personally secure in order for education to take place. As a place of work and study, West Valley–Mission Community College District should be free of sexual harassment, sex discrimination, and all forms of sexual intimidation and exploitation. Any violation of trust, any form of intimidation or exploitation, regardless of gender, damages the institution's educational process by undermining the essential freedoms of inquiry and expression. All students, staff and faculty must be assured that the District will take action to prevent misconduct. Anyone who engages in sexual harassment and/or sex discrimination shall be subject to sanctions.

 

FEES

 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration, with a 10-business day grace period.  All accounts will be checked on Monday of the third week of the semester. If you have an outstanding balance, a hold will be placed on your records and you may be dropped from your class(es). A hold will prevent you from receiving grades, transcripts or other college services (i.e. parking permits) until your account is paid in full.

 

 

 

­­CONTRACT:  Print your name, sign your name, and fill in the date

 

I, _______________________________ (print name), understand that in order to pass English 1A, I must accomplish the following:

 

         Earn a 70% or greater in the class

         Pass at least one of the in-class exams

 

Signature: _____________________________________      Date: ______________

 

NOTE:  This is a College Course.   Expect to find some adult subject matter and adult language in certain reading assigned.  

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT ERROR POLICY

The English Department requires that a passing paper in English 1A have no more than five major errors per double-spaced page.  This policy is applicable to each of your take home papers, including the Research Paper.

Major Errors:

  • subject-verb agreement
  • run-on sentence
  • fragment
  • pronoun agreement
  • pronoun reference
  • verb tense
  • singular/plural
  • unclear
  • verb form

  

Note:  All HW assignments are subject to possible change.  Unless indicated otherwise, all readings are from The Little, Brown Reader. (J)=Journal Entry Due.

WK 1—Tues, Feb 1-- syllabus, icebreakers, in-class sample essay, etc

 

WK 2—HW DUE on Tues, Feb 8—

 a.   “A Writer Reads”—pgs 2-20

b.   (J) Angelou, “Graduation”--pgs 306-315

c.   Soltaroff, “You’re Not Catholic, Are You?” (handout)

d.   Mukherjee, “Two Ways to Belong to America”—pgs 262-264

 

WK 3—Tues, Feb 15—HW DUE

a.   Rodriguez, “Public and Private Language”—pgs 302-306

b.   (J) Karr, “Texas, 1961” (handout)

c.   Wolff, “Powder” (handout)

d.  McCourt, “Brooklyn &Limerick” (handout)

 

WK 4—HW Due on Tues, Feb 22--

a.   Rough Draft of Essay #1

b.   Hayden, “Those Winter Sundays”—pg 194

c.   Roethke, “My Papa’s Waltz” (handout)

d.   (J) Kinkaid, “Girl”—pgs 192-193

e.   Brady, “I Want A Wife”—pgs 179-181

f.   Piercy, “Barbie Doll” (print a copy from the bottom of my web page and bring it to class)                                      

 

WK 5—HW DUE on Tues, Mar 1

a.   Final Draft of Essay #1

b.   “A Reader Writes”—pgs 21-42

c.   “Academic Writing”—pgs 44-78

d.   (J) Shen, “The Classroom and the Wider Culture”—pgs 331-340   

e.  “Ethos, Pathos, and Logos” (you need to print out

      a copy from the bottom of my web page and bring it

      to class)  

f.  Winn, “The End of Play”—pgs 408-414

Go over Prompt for Essay 2, Topic Sentences, Practicing Quotations and Citations

 

WK 6—HW DUE on Tues, Mar 8

a.   (J) Hochschild, “The Second Shift”—pgs 166-171

b.   Thomas, “A New Scarlet Letter”--pgs 529-531

c.    Quotations Exercise

We will go over Sentence and Paragraph Focus in class 

 

WK 7—Tues, Mar 15

In-Class Essay (Essay 2)

We will form groups for presentations and allocate the following articles: 

-- “Yes, Credit Card Companies Market too Agressively to Youths” (pgs 116-118), “What if We Deport Them All?” (pgs 270-272), “Big Mother is Watching” (pgs 491-493), “Confessions of an Erstwile Child” (pgs 161-165), “The ‘Mommy Track’ Isn’t Anti-Woman” (pgs 394-400)

 

WK 8—HW DUE on Tues, Mar 22

Prepare for Presentations

 

WK 9—Tues, Mar 29

Spring Break!!!

 

WK 10—HW DUE on Tues, April 5

Presentations (all groups)

 

WK 11—HW DUE on Tues, April 12

a.     “Writing an Argument”—pgs 79-120

b.  (J)  King, “Letter from Birmingham Jail”—pgs 514-528 

     c.    Singer and Mason--"Wal-Mart: Everyday Low Prices--At What

            Cost?" pgs 587-592 

     d.    Harrop—“Calculating the Real Cost of ‘Everyday Low Prices’ (handout)  

     e.    Bring in 1 Internet article from Wal-Mart’s web

            site that says something positive about the

            company; bring in 1 Internet article from

            the web that says something negative about Wal-

            Mart

 

WK 12—HW DUE on Tues, April 19

a.     (J) Richman's "The Chutzpah of Wal-Mart's critics" pgs 592-593.

We will watch Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Prices

 

WK 13—HW DUE on Tues, April 26

 

a.     Rough Draft of Essay #3

b.     J) Morrison Sula pgs 1-48

Peer Response, Introduction to Research Paper

 

WK 14—HW DUE on Tues, May 3

a.  Final Draft of Essay #3

b. (J) Morrison Sula pgs 49-85

 

WK 15—HW DUE on Tues, May 10

a) (J) Morrison Sula finish book

b) Walker, “Everday Use” (print out from my web page and bring to class)

 

WK 16—HW DUE on Tues, May 17

Prepare for the Final Exam

 

FINAL EXAM—Tues, May 24 7-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGLISH 1A-94970   Thurs 700-10:10PM   N3-401   Andy Varbel
Office Hours: Adjunct Faculty Center Thurs 330-430 PM   Spring 2011
Phone #: (408) 864-8999 Ext. 3509    E-mail:
acv1356@aol.com
My Web Page:
http://varbelenglish.tripod.com/
My mailbox is found in the Adjunct Faculty Center
 
                                                     

Texts:  Required              

1.  Stubbs, Barnet, Cain, The Little, Brown Reader, 11th edition only
2.  Morrison, Sula

Recommended:  Keys for Writers  

Course Description: 

Integrated approach to reading, writing, and critical thinking intended to develop ability to read and write complex, college-level prose.  Current MLA documentation guidelines are also emphasized.  This course is transferable to State Schools and UC’s.  It also fulfills the English requirement for an associate degree for various majors.  Prerequisite: English 908 or English 59 or qualifying score on the placement test.  Advisory:  Reading 53

Course Organization:

The course is organized around a process approach.  Readings from the text are emphasized, with considerable importance attached to peer group participation.

Course Requirements:

1.  Participation in class.
2.  10 surprise quizzes on the reading due for that day.
3.  10 Journal Entries.
4.  Occasional homework questions.
5.  Two take home formal essays.
6.  An In-Class Midterm.
7.  A research paper.
8.  Final Exam, which will be an in-class essay.
                                           
                                                                                                                                                                                                           -9.   A group presentation.  

                                                                                                                     

Student Learning Outcomes:

 

 

Upon completion of Engl 1A, students will be able to:

 

  • Write a college-level essay, including an argument and research essay, of at least 1,000 words that is focused, tailored to a particular audience and purpose, developed with relevant, well-organized support, documented according to MLA guidelines, and expressed in correct and varied sentences.
  • Analyze culturally diverse, college-level writing, including a full-length work.

 

Objectives:

 

Students should learn to:

 

  • Create a college-level essay, including an argument and research essay, with an identifiable focus, tailored to a particular audience and purpose, with well-developed, relevant, and clearly organized supporting detail.
  • Effectively perform the steps of the writing process, including narrowing a topic, finding a main idea, developing and organizing a variety of support, drafting, editing, revising, and proofreading.
  • Create clear, grammatical and varied sentences using appropriate diction and correct spelling and punctuation [with no more than five major errors per page].
  • Read, understand, and analyze culturally diverse, college-level writing, including essays, articles, stories, and a full-length fiction book.
  • Locate, evaluate, and effectively synthesize supporting material drawn from readings or other sources in an essay.
  • Precisely document outside sources in his or her essays using current MLA form.
  • Write 8,000-10,000 words of evaluated work

 Grading:  This is a letter grade only course.   Each of your assignments will receive points.  90%=A, 80%=B, 70%=C, 60%=D  (Possible 900 points)

        Narrative Essay=75 points

        In-Class Analytical Essay=100 pts

        Persuasive Essay=125 points

        Research Paper=200 pts

        In-Class Final Exam, which is a Literary Analysis=200 pts

        Group Presentation=50 pts

        Ten Quizzes=5 pts each=50 pts

        Ten Journal Entries=5 pts each=50 pts

        Participation=50 pts

 

NOTE:  You must earn at least 70% to pass the class.  In addition, you must pass at least one of the in-class exams to pass the class.

 

Journal Entries:  For most weeks, a journal entry is due based upon the reading.  The entry should be at least 1 full page in length, typed, double spaced, and 12-point font.  The entry should not summarize the reading, but instead provide your reaction to it.  You can relate a similar personal experience or, if you like, give your opinion in response to the author’s or simply explain whether you enjoyed the reading and why or why not.   Be sure to explain why you feel the way you do.  The purpose of the journal entries is to give you additional practice writing in a less formal setting than the essays due for the class.  The journals are a place to try out ideas and take chances without worry about undue consequence. 

Formal Essays:  These essays must be at least 4 pages in length, typed, double spaced, 12-point font, have a title, and be free of excessive spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors or lack of organization.  Each essay must adhere to the current MLA documentation format.  You may turn in an essay one week late though this will result in your paper being lowered one full formal grade.  I will not accept any papers later than one week after the due date. 

The English Department recently adopted a 5 error per page policy.  If a Formal Essay contains 5 or more errors per page, the essay won’t receive credit.  Students can rewrite each formal essay ONCE to receive a letter grade and points.   In order to be able to rewrite the essay, students MUST be present on peer response day with two COMPLETE copies of the rough draft of the paper and turn those in along with the final draft and the feedback received for the rough draft.   If a student’s Research Paper contains 5 or more errors per page, it won’t receive credit.

Research Paper:

The Research Paper must be typed, double-spaced, use 12-point font, have a title, contain in-text citations, be 8-10 pages in length, accompanied by a Works Cited Sheet and adhere to the most current MLA documentation format.  Two rough drafts and student response sheets must accompany the final paper and all work must be stapled together.  The Works Cited Sheet must have 5 or more secondary sources.  The Research Paper is a mandatory project and must be satisfactorily completed and submitted on time to pass the class.

Presentation:  You will participate in one group presentation in which your group’s goal will be to create a dramatic and engaging discussion of the issues in a particular article that you will be assigned from The Little, Brown Reader.  Your presentation should take the form of a talk show with a host moderating a discussion about the central issue that the article focuses on.  You will receive an individual grade for this presentation, which will not necessarily be the same as the grade of your other group members.  Points will be based upon thoughtfulness, clarity, and creativity.

Participation:

Criteria:  0 absences with excellent participation, 45-50 points; 1 absence with good participation, 40-44 points; 2 absences with good participation, 35-39 points.  Participation includes discussion, group work, arriving on time, turning in work on time.  Chronic tardiness, lack of preparation, late work will lower your participation grade to 29 points or below.

As we discuss many controversial topics in class, we are all responsible for courtesy to each other, good will, and listening to others’ points of view even if we don’t share them.  Speakers should be recognized and should keep comments under one minute at a time to allow for maximum discussion. 

 Attendance:

Be here.  Attendance every day is mandatory.  Be here on time and fully prepared.  You are responsible for what happens in class whether you are here or not; get a phone or email partner so you can contact another class member if you are absent.

Missing more than ten minutes of any class meeting counts as half an absence.  Should you happen to come in late, NEVER walk in between the other students and myself.  Instead, be respectful to your classmates and me and inconspicuously make your entrance.  But do everything you can to be here on time.  If you are late, you may lose the opportunity to take a particular quiz.   Quizzes cannot be made up.

Missing an entire class meeting constitutes an absence.   More than 2 absences may result in your being dropped from the course.

Rude and disruptive behavior is not acceptable and will not be tolerated.  Students should not talk while I am addressing the class. 

Plagiarism:

Don’t do it.  Plagiarism is hereby defined as handing in any work as your own when in fact, you did not create it yourself.  This includes, but is not limited to, essays downloaded from the web; essays copied from a book, newspaper or magazine; essays written by a friend/ tutor/ spouse/ sibling/ relative; essays you “wrote” but which were more or less dictated to you by someone else; essays you acquired from a “research service.”   In addition, if an essay includes facts that are not part of general knowledge, or includes other people’s ideas, you must acknowledge the sources of that information.  If you plagiarize once, you will receive a 0 on the assignment, I will speak to you confidentially, and administrative follow up may result.  If the student continues to cheat, he or she  will fail the course.  Remember: all of your work must be your own.

Cell Phones and Beepers:

Keep them turned OFF during class.  Allowing your cell phone or beeper to ring during class is disruptive and extremely rude to your classmates and me.

 

Asking Questions:

Please do.  Always ask me if you do not understand an assignment or the class work, or if you are unsure of what we are doing and why.  Also, please do not hesitate to come talk with me during office hours if you have any questions or concerns.  

Disability Statement: 

Federal legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities.  If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact DISC in S2-201 or call (408) 855-5085 or (408) 727-9243 TTY.

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

According to the Vice President of Instruction, it is the student’s responsibility to know the evacuation procedures, evacuation route, and assembly area for their classrooms.  In case of an emergency, you are to follow the directions of your instructor. When directed to evacuate the classroom, be sure to take all of your belongings when you leave and remain with your class in the assembly area until you receive further directions.

 

SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND SEX DISCRIMINATION POLICY

 

Members of an academic community—students, faculty and staff—must be able to work in an atmosphere of mutual respect and trust. Students, teachers and staff must feel personally secure in order for education to take place. As a place of work and study, West Valley–Mission Community College District should be free of sexual harassment, sex discrimination, and all forms of sexual intimidation and exploitation. Any violation of trust, any form of intimidation or exploitation, regardless of gender, damages the institution's educational process by undermining the essential freedoms of inquiry and expression. All students, staff and faculty must be assured that the District will take action to prevent misconduct. Anyone who engages in sexual harassment and/or sex discrimination shall be subject to sanctions.

 

 

 

FEES

 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration, with a 10-business day grace period.  All accounts will be checked on Monday of the third week of the semester. If you have an outstanding balance, a hold will be placed on your records and you may be dropped from your class(es). A hold will prevent you from receiving grades, transcripts or other college services (i.e. parking permits) until your account is paid in full.

 

 

 

­­CONTRACT:  Print your name, sign your name, and fill in the date

 

I, _______________________________ (print name), understand that in order to pass English 1A , I must accomplish the following:

 

        Earn a 70% or greater in the class

        Pass at least one of the in-class exams

 

Signature:_________________________________  Date:______________

  

NOTE:  This is a College Course.   Expect to find some adult subject matter and adult language in certain reading assigned.  

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT  ERROR POLICY

The English Department requires that a passing paper in English 1A have no more than five major errors per double-spaced page.   This policy is applicable to each of your take home papers, including the Research Paper.

 

Major Errors:

subject-verb agreement
run-on sentence
fragment
pronoun agreement
pronoun reference
verb tense
singular/plural
unclear
verb form

 

 

WK 5—HW DUE on Thurs, Mar 3

a.   Final Draft of Essay #1

b.   “A Reader Writes”—pgs 21-42

c.   “Academic Writing”—pgs 44-78

d.   (J) Shen, “The Classroom and the Wider Culture”—pgs 331-340   

e.   “Ethos, Pathos, and Logos” (you need to print out

      a copy from the bottom of my web page and bring it

       to class)  

f.  Winn, “The End of Play”—pgs 408-414

     Go over Prompt for Essay 2, Topic Sentences, Practicing  

Quotations and Citations

 

WK 6—HW DUE on Thurs, Mar 10

a.   (J) Hochschild, “The Second Shift”—pgs 166-171

b.   Thomas, “A New Scarlet Letter”--pgs 529-531

c.   Quotations HW

We will also go over Sentence Focus and Paragraph Focus in class

 

WK 7—HW DUE on Thurs, Mar 17

In-Class Essay Midterm (2 hours)

We will form groups for presentations and allocate the following articles: 

-- “Yes, Credit Card Companies Market too Agressively to Youths” (pgs 116-118), “What if We Deport Them All?” (pgs 270-272), “Big Mother is Watching” (pgs 491-493), “Confessions of an Erstwile Child” (pgs 161-165), “The ‘Mommy Track’ Isn’t Anti-Woman” (pgs 394-400)

 

WK 8—HW DUE on Thurs, Mar 24

Prepare for Presentations

 

WK 9—Thurs, Mar 31—Spring Break

 

WK 10—Thurs, Apr 7

Presentations (all groups)

 

WK 11—Thurs, Apr 14

a.  “Writing an Argument”—pgs 79-12

b.  (J)  King, “Letter from Birmingham Jail”—pgs 514-528 

c.    Singer and Mason--"Wal-Mart: Everyday Low Prices--At What Cost?" pgs 587-592 

 d.     Harrop—“Calculating the Real Cost of ‘Everyday Low Prices’ (handout)  

 e.    Bring in 1 Internet article from Wal-Mart’s web

            site that says something positive about the

            company; bring in 1 Internet article from

            the web that says something negative about Wal- Mart

 

WK 12—Thurs, Apr 21

a.     Richman's "The Chutzpah of Wal-Mart's critics" pgs 592-593.

We will watch Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Prices

 

WK 13—Thurs, Apr 28

a.     Rough Draft of Essay #3

b.     J) Morrison Sula pgs 1-48

Peer Response, Introduction to Research Paper

 

WK 14—Thurs, May 5

     a.  Final Draft of Essay #3

     b. (J) Morrison Sula pgs 49-85

 

WK 15—Thurs, May 12

(J) Morrison Sula pgs 89-135

 

WK 16—Thurs, May 19

a. (J) Finish reading Sula

b. Walker, “Everday Use” (print out from my web page and bring to class)

 

FINAL EXAM—Thurs, May 26     7-9 PM

Research Paper due

 

 

       

             Essay Prompts

 

English 1A—Essay #1   Narration                                                                  

At least 4 pages long, double-spaced, computer printed, MLA formatted, and 12 font.  If you turn in less than that, you will lose points.

Content:   In your introductory paragraph, summarize one of the assigned articles—“Graduation,” “You’re Not Catholic, Are You?,” “Two Ways to Belong in America,” “Public and Private Language,” “Powder,”  or “Texas, 1961.”  Your summary should include the author’s name, the name of the essay, your own words (no quotes), six to seven sentences, should leave out your opinion, and include the main events. 

Then in your thesis you should establish a connection between some aspect of the article that you have summarized and a story that you will tell.  The thesis should be one to two sentences and be placed at the end of your first paragraph.  An example thesis might be “Like Angelou, I too have been stereotyped, but, in my case, I was stereotyped one time in High School when I tried out for football.”

Here are some possible topics for thesis statements for this essay:  an encounter with racism or stereotypes of any sort if you summarize “Graduation,” an experience involving alienation if you summarize “You’re Not Catholic, Are You?,” “Public and Private Language,” or “Two Ways to Belong in America,” an event that shows either closeness or distance to any family member if you summarize “Powder” or “Texas, 1961.”       

After you’ve given your thesis, write at least three more pages about that event in your life.  Use detail in an engaging way to grab your reader and provide clarity for your narrative; remember to include sensory detail and three metaphors or similes to make your prose come alive.   The conclusion should move to the present day, and articulate how you NOW feel about that event and provide further explanation for how your story relates back to the article you chose to summarize.

Notes: Use present tense when describing an article and past tense to describe the event in your life    Grading:  75 points possible.  You will be graded based on the following criteria:  summary, thesis, sensory detail, organization and clarity, similes and metaphors, grammar, spelling, and form.

 

REMINDER:  See Five Major Errors Per Page Policy


 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT ERROR POLICY

 

The English Department requires that a passing paper in English 1A have no more than five major errors per double-spaced page.

 

Major Errors:

subject-verb agreement
run-on sentence
fragment
pronoun agreement
pronoun reference
verb tense
singular/plural
unclear
verb form